Back in Style (the Problem with Problems)

Apparently, acid rain is back.  Under the headline ‘Eco-problems of the 80s return to haunt us,’ New Scientist details the rebound of acidity levels in UK streams after decades of decline.  What was once considered a capstone victory of the second-wave environmentalists was not, it seems, made to last.

As a recent resident of neighborhoods such as Seattle’s Capitol Hill, London’s Shoreditch, and LA’s Echo Park, I can attest first-hand to the fact that pH levels aren’t the only unwelcome resurrection from the decade before last… tight pants and neon are a full part of the package too.

They share more than historical heritage.  Causes, not unlike fashions, are fundamentally built on a fixed timeline.  They’re fueled as much by the object as the action — and the objects are constantly in flux, competing for attention, trading for time in the spotlight.

The fallacy of a problem solved is at the heart of why cause marketing isn’t a viable tactic for changing lifestyles: you only end up reaching the people who have already built their lifestyles around a cause.

© Ryan Cunningham 2008

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thoughts at the collision of business, brand and creativity

I'm Ryan Cunningham. I help companies and culture play nice with each other. At CREATURE we call this Brand Strategy, a term that carries a nice halo of reliability and structure. Here, I'm just another guy who thinks about the world and writes it down from time to time.

The result is a pile of knowledge to be used in, and for, the future. Feel free to sift through the heap for useful connections.

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